Unknown Origins

Jeremy Parker on Entrepreneurship

January 11, 2021 Attitude. Imagination. Execution. Season 1 Episode 42
Unknown Origins
Jeremy Parker on Entrepreneurship
Show Notes Transcript

Authentic entrepreneurs can see the future coming and create solutions to problems we didn't know existed that make people's lives and society better. Swag.com co-founder Jeremy Parker provides perspective on his entrepreneurial journey. 

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Music by Iain Mutch 

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Roy Sharples:

Hello, I'm Roy Sharples, and welcome to the unknown origins podcast. Why are you listening to this podcast? Are you an industry expert? Looking for insights growing your career? Or are you a dear friend, helping sponsor your old pal on? I created the unknown origins podcast to have the most inspiring conversations with creative industry personalities and experts about entrepreneurship, pop culture, art, music, film and fashion. Authentic entrepreneurs can see the future coming. I create solutions to problems we didn't know exist that make people's lives and society better. Jeremy Parker, co founded slack.com to be the best place to buy quality promotional products that people actually want to keep, where they have curated and streamlined the entire buying and distribution experience. growing the company in 2019, from selling 7 million to eight figures in 2020, working with the likes of tik tok, Facebook, Google, Amazon, Netflix and Spotify. Then the pandemic hit where they had the resilience and agility to adopt that approach by selling branded face masks. For every 100 baht, they donated 10 to people in need. Jeremy graduated from Boston University in 2007. majoring in film production, a junior in college, his feature length documentary, won the Audience Award at the 2006 vale Film Festival. He then started a creative promotional product division under MV sport. Afterward, he began a company with his brother David and Jesse Itzler, co founder of marquee jet investor and partner and Zico, coconut water, and owner of the Atlanta Hawks. Hello, and welcome, Jeremy, congratulations on all of your triumphs thus far. What an exciting and adventurous life you've LED.

Jeremy Parker:

Thank you so much. It's been a it's been a, an experience a wild ride so far. And as an entrepreneur, I feel like I'm only getting started. What inspired and attracted you to become an entrepreneur in the first place? You know, honestly, I think for most entrepreneurs, they would probably give you the same answer. or similar answers. It's kind of like a life calling. It's what you're meant to do. I used to be a a documentary filmmaker. I went to college for documentary filmmaking all throughout high school Mike's my passion was really online marketing and commercials and analyzing printed how to tell stories. So I went to Boston University, I thought I was always gonna be a branding guy. I was gonna work at you know, marketing agency. That was my my ultimate goal. And when I went to bu and I looked at the course curriculum of marketing versus film, I realized they were really the exact same thing. Except for film, I will learn how to make videos. And this was at the onset of YouTube. So I thought that that would probably come in handy being able to tell stories through videos. So I went down this, this really deep dive into filmmaking, probably the only filmmaker in my program, we never really wanted to be a filmmaker. And then I when I was 18, or so I made a documentary with my brother, this feature length documentary called 1%. That ultimately won the Vail Film Festival. So we were the youngest people ever to win this film festivals major film festival. Wow. And I was in Vail, Colorado. And I'm, I'm at the kind of the, quote unquote, celebrity tent and half the room are these big celebrity names you've all heard of, and half the room are these more struggling artists. And I kind of did like an internal gut check was one of those moments as real moments I can like, point back to and say, am I good enough? Is this really what I want to do with my life? And usually, you would think somebody who wins his big film festival be writing in high and be like, Okay, I know for a fact, this is what I'm good at. This is what I want to pursue. And it was the complete opposite for me, for me was really doing an internal gut check. Like do I love filmmaking? You know, I never love filmmaking do am I even good enough to make this a career? I think I really was I, you know, I thought it was pretty good. But I just I didn't feel it. And it was like a real kind of moment of clarity. And I figured when I got back to be you, and I was a senior at the time, I should really start thinking about what I wanted to do what I'm good at. And frankly, I didn't know. So after I graduated college, I thought, What am I What if I started my business, the first business, and I know it no business experience whatsoever, but just trying to learn as much as I can about what I'm good at what I enjoyed. So I started at high end t shirt company. And I thought from the very beginning, it sounds easy to start a T shirt company. But if you really kind of break down the components, you know, you have to figure out a user experience and how to build a website. And this is before Shopify days. Yeah. So there's a lot harder to build sites, you know, marketing and branding and production and telling a story and all these different components. To do what makes a great product sell, and you know how to actually make do sales, I've never done sales in my life. So showing up at people's offices, or stores and trying to show off the products and try to get my product in their stores, it was just a lot of learning. And it kind of sent me on this path of being an entrepreneur and really understanding what I truly enjoy. And I think it's very important for entrepreneurs to love what they do, because you're going to get hit with a lot of things. You know, things are not going to work out there. They never work out how you expected them. And you have to have the perseverance to overcome and and just to really, truly believe in yourself that you're going to make it successful, by all means necessary. That's truly inspirational, and impressive. You got so much awareness and clarity of thought about your purpose at the peak moment, whilst many others would caution and sell out.

Roy Sharples:

True entrepreneurs are iconoclasts rebels with a cause who navigate through unchartered territories, make unique connections between disparate universes past and present, to light the way into the future, and provides something new to the world by overturning the status quo by positively impacting people's lives and progressing society by moving it forward? At what point in your journey? Did you dream up the big bold idea that was swag.com.

Jeremy Parker:

To continue with the previous story, it's actually to me it's really bizarre way to get into swag, you know, the industry of promotional products or selling swag is not the sexiest of ones knowing things. I want to be, you know, the king of swag. It doesn't really it's not like, it's not what people are like aspire to everyone wants to build like the coolest social networking app or this, you know, a consumer branded products or consumer focused business where everyone knows your business. And everyone's You know, you're like a celebrity entrepreneur, that's never really been my focus at all never even thought about that. From the very beginning. My first job out of college, when I started that T shirt company, ultimately it was in 2007. Now I remember I don't know if you remember 2007. But this was when Bear Stearns, all the banks are going under all these high end t shirt companies and all these t shirts stores that were selling to you just went on there. So we didn't really, it was probably the worst time that you could launch a business I launched about three months before the recession hit. So it was very tough. But during that time, I learned a lot how to be adaptable. I came up with this initiative. It sounds gimmicky, it was gimmicky, but it helped me a lot where basically, we tied the price of the T shirts to the price of the Dow Jones every 100 points, the Dow the stock market drop, people would get a discount on their t shirt price. And I wrote to Mark Cuban and just put yourself in a 22 year olds, no shoes for a second. I was just learning as much as I could about business. So part of that learning experience was not only starting my own business, but he was reading every single thing I could about successful business people. So I was a big fan of this blog by Mark Cuban called blog Maverick. And I wrote to Mark and I said, Hey, I just started this business. Really bad timing. So I came up with this, you know, marketing initiative. Let me know what you think. And we he did literally within 10 minutes of me sending it to him. I couldn't believe it was him. He responded to me is like Jeremy, I love your story. And do you mind if I post it on my blog? Wow, he shared my blog post, I wrote my letter to him and you can still find it on blog Maverick. And what it did was, it got me in front of a lot more people. And when those people ended up writing a story about me in Ad Age, which is advertising magazine. And that got seen by one of the top guys in the promotional product space. So all these different kinds of things linked up. And what happened is this company MV sport Mary Victor sport, really large company in the promotional product space, reached out to me and we connected and we became friends and I was learning about this whole swag promotional product industry from about, you know, 13 years ago. And I would go to trade shows and I would see who the experience was for like, who the buyer was, they experienced the buying swipe, and I realized at that moment, this is 13 years ago, how broken old and fragmented industry was, but the buyer was it was a much older buyer. So I thought maybe that's just how they like to buy swag. But you fast forward over the last you know, 12 years, the industry has remained old broken and fragmented, but the buyer changed and that was kind of a big aha moment. So I got comments. Well, if the buyers changing they clearly don't want to look at 1000s upon 1000s of products they don't want to have to you know, get a sales call from somebody on the phone or major catalogs is heavy catalogs to sift through they would probably like to streamline the experience they probably like to know check out like any other you know really nicely designed consumer product like treat the B the B swag buyer as a consumer because they really are and make the experience really good for them. So 2016 launched swag calm. What I mean by launch is literally we had a landing page under swag calm and we just went out like traveling salesman me my co founder Josh We knock on doors, we went to Facebook's office, we would walk up and down, we work hallways of all the different weworks trying to present ourselves and show off the products that we want to sell. Really, it wasn't about making money in those early days, it was really just about learning experience. Who are the buyers? Why did they buy swag, we noticed, you know, there's the office manager that buy swag for internal corporate culture. There's the HR manager that buy swag for onboarding new hires. There's the marketing team that buys swag for events and trade shows. There's all their sales team to buy swag to sending to leads to help close sales. So there's all these different buyers within companies that by swag for many different reasons. So our feeling is instead of going after all of them, let's figure out who we think is the easiest to get in front of. So we pinpointed the office manager. And we thought the office managers probably the easiest way to get in the company think of like a Trojan horse strategy. Yeah, because they're usually younger, they're 20 to 25, it might even be their first job out of college. They don't come with like these big relationships from previous companies that they work for. And so that's what we really went after. But they weren't the biggest spenders of all of them. You know, obviously, the marketing team spends a lot more than internal corporate culture swag. But we felt like that was the initial point of entry that we should go after and then expand from within. That's admirable swag.com went on to sell over 7 million in products in 2019. And then into eight figures in 2020. And then also, when the pandemic hit, you start to sell branded face by face masks as well. And for every 100 baht, you're donating 10, to people in need, which is just fantastic. Yeah, thank you. Yes, exactly right. 2019, we did about 6.9 million in sales. And we ended 2020 a year, obviously everyone knows has been extremely challenging for everyone. And it was very challenging for us as well, the whole promotional product industry as a whole was down over 40%. In q2, it was like it fell off a cliff. And our sales as well, you know, first week of March, we did 200,000 sales, the first week of March, we're riding high, we're just coming off of our two best one of our two best months ever in January, February, which was more than double the 2019, January, February. So we were feeling we were gonna do 40 million in 2020. That's that was our goal. That's what we were paid for. And it fell off a cliff and went from 200,000, the first week of March to 19,000. The second. So when you go from from such a high to low, you have to really kind of dig deep and figure out ways to survive. And obviously we are getting in from people were saying you should cut everybody and you should bunker down. And you should do all these things. And we were lucky and thankful that we didn't listen to a lot of the people who were telling us this, because we knew something that they didn't know, we knew the resiliency of our team, you spent a lot of time building our team, we spent a lot of time making sure we have the right people in the right positions. And we knew we would figure out a way to survive it. And, and our feeling was we actually had a great opportunity. If every single other company in the industry is cutting, everyone's cutting everyone's in this kind of, you know, retreat mentality. And we felt like you know, what, what if we go on the offensive, what if we attack the situation? We don't just like sit here and say, you know, we have bad luck. Because if you if you think about on the surface, it makes sense, right? Nobody's in the office. So office managers are not buying swag for internal office needs. No one's being hired. So HR managers are not buying for onboarding new hires, there's no events or trade shows so that marketers are not needing to buy swag. It makes perfect sense on the surface. But we felt like there was a lot of other things that we have that other people didn't have that would allow us to win. And we've been building for the last two years, even before the pandemic. And we were building this swag distribution platform, the ability for companies to not only buy swag for their office, which is the traditional way to buy swag, you buy swag in bulk, right? You're buying 1000 t shirts they're sending to a conference or your office, we've been building this this platform that allows you to buy swag in bulk, we hold it in our fulfillment center, and then give them the tools to distribute that swag to 1000 different addresses at once. So really kind of automating the entire distribution experience, like the first four years is all about making the experience of buying swag ease. Yeah. The last two years were about well, how do you get swag in the hands of your remote employees, your best customers, your leads to help close sales like all these different things. And we had this service that it was a nice to have before the pandemic and we figured you know what, this is gonna be a need to have in the new remote working culture. So in 2020, we went from the highs to the depths really low March, April, May and June. We're way below March, April, May June the previous year to then doing our best five months ever we did 1.9 million in September and 1.9 million October 3.4 million in November and in December, we ended last year with over 50 million in sales. And yeah, exactly we said about about the the masks a big part of you know our survival story really and and we felt like we have this access to all these different manufacturers that are now turning, they're literally turning their manufacturing components like making t shirts, it's now making masks. And there's a lot of people in the world who didn't have masks, you know, everyone was at that time, if you take yourself back, people really didn't know where they really get safety, everyone was terrified. So our feeling was what if we can use our connections to allow companies to buy mass for all their employees and make their employees feel safe. And it was just something that we really allowed us to be in business over those few months, that were very scary. And also, it allowed us to give our customers something that they they truly needed, that you typically wouldn't think, to go to swag.com to buy masks, but we had the resources, so we can really offer this to our customers. And then we feel like, well, there's a lot of people who need masks who just can't afford it, who don't work for a company. So we said for every 100 basketball, we're going to donate 10 to people in need. And over the last four years, you know, the four months of the really heavy pandemic, we were able to donate over 5000 masks to frontline workers to homeless shelters to people who really needed it. So we're proud of we're proud of this year, on all fronts, it's been a it's been a wild ride. Congratulations to you and the [email protected] Not only is that an impressive business achievement, it just goes to show how ethically responsible and empathetic you are and how you put people first. And that's obviously been noted within the industry. And it's reflective within the diversity of your client portfolio, with the types of clients that you're working with, such as Spotify, Amazon, Google Tech Talk, Facebook, yeah, we work at this point with close to 6000 customers, and they do range exactly from the big companies in the world, the Microsoft's and the Googles, and Amazons, the small startups. So our strategy from the very beginning of the business. You know, typically as entrepreneur, everyone always says, You should work your way up, that's a common phrase, as beings, you know, you start from the bottom, you get better, you get better, you get better. And then ultimately, you're going to hit those big, big name companies. And we took a very different approach from from day one, we wanted to get a big name company, because our feeling was we have this swag.com brand. Yeah, we want people to come to our site, and see the role of logos, they want to see them that swag.com works to Facebook and Google and exactly, we need those big customers to give the credibility and the social proof to all the other companies that come to us to feel confident. So that was literally by design and strategy that we started. Our first customer was Facebook, you know, we we got an introduction to a friend who got us into the building. And then literally, I mean, Josh, my co founder, walked around the New York City Office of Facebook, talking to as many Facebook employees just to get somebody who wanted to buy swag. And it's really kind of hilarious. And when they wanted to buy swag, somebody said, Yeah, actually, I can use it for my team, we did not care about making money, it was just about, you know, getting the experience, understanding the products that they want, and understanding who the customer was, and getting that that company name, that big logo on their website. And now Facebook, you know, they buy all the time. I mean, from the first order now that it's different divisions is people in the California location, or New York locations all over, are buying swag from us. And we're holding their swag in inventory, and we're distributing it to 1000 different addresses. But it really started from that one initial, you know, me and Josh really being a traveling salesman. And then I remember the next day we went to we work office, and we were asked us who else we're working with. And we said Facebook, and obviously we weren't lying, but they probably assume when we said Facebook, we were working with so many other companies. But really it was just Facebook. So we kind of did that cycle for for the first kind of five logos. Yeah. And then it was just about well, now we have kind of the brand of who we are, let's actually build the right platform to automate this experience. So that's what we did in 2017, we launched the first version of our e commerce site, and we've been slowly and not that slowly, but trying to really chip away at all the problems that people have, and make the experience now much better. And, and we're nowhere near where we want to be. But we're at a point at that, that we can actually transact, you know, an unlimited number of orders at this point. And we're just trying to keep making the experience really great for the customer, always having the customer in mind. Because they're really the most important thing.

Roy Sharples:

So what does being an entrepreneur mean to you, Jeremy?

Jeremy Parker:

Being an entrepreneur is it's an exciting job. You know, for me, I never wanted to fear waking up, you know, and coming to work. And I know a lot of people have this Sunday scaries. And, you know, Monday's rolling around, they have to, you know, work I wanted to build a company that people enjoy, you know, whether it's for me, I want to enjoy what I'm doing. I want all my employees and all my co workers and all my teammates to really feel passionate about what we're building and seeing growth. So that's for me, just you know, having a great work experience, where you enjoy it because it if you think about it, work plays a major part of your life. It takes a major part of your life. And if you're at a place where you're not happy and you feel fulfilled. That's not a way to live any type of life. So I feel like for me just trying to build the right culture for my team, and give a great experience to our customers, you know, building something of true value that our customers can, you know, can rely on us. I mean, it's a lot of different things. But really, it's the ability to come up with an idea and see the idea come to life. So I just think it's an amazing thing.

Roy Sharples:

Excellent. In terms of your creative process, how do you make the invisible visible by dreaming up ideas, developing them into concepts, and then bringing them to actualization?

Jeremy Parker:

It is a team effort. And I think as an entrepreneur, you have to remove ego, completely. And for me, I've done that many years ago. But for I've, I've a very simple process, every morning, I wake up relatively early, or like six o'clock, and I do about a six mile either walk or run, just to clear my head, like me time, because once I get to the office, it's all about work. It's all about, you know, making the experience better. So I need to kind of like, center myself, and feel like I've checked something off the box, I had it early, when to start the day, every morning, when I do as I have two meetings, I never miss, I have an hour design meeting with my designer, and I have an hour meeting with my CTO. And I'm we're very product focused. And we've been very product focused from the very beginning, we, I would say that we're a product, we're product driven business, just to put things in perspective, we just hired our first salesperson four months ago. So we did a 50 million in sales. And the majority of that was done without any salespeople. Our product itself was the thing that's closing the sales. Yeah, so this next year is really about layering on the sales functionality. And in the sales team, on top of the product that we already build. And our feeling is we're going to be growing a lot this year, because we're gonna be able to really push sales and, and add a real sales driven organization above a product that clearly makes its own sales. But for me, the creative process is being open minded, hearing what people think coming up with ideas, designing it, seeing in a real world, getting feedback from our tech team understanding is what we have envisioned. A good idea, do they think it's a good idea? Is it is it possible to build how complicated is going to be, and then keep refining, refining, refining, keep redesigning it in real time. So you get on piece of paper, and you get a lot of different inputs. And then I show the features to my head of customer service and get his input? Is this something that customers really want? And then you show it to the ops team? Is this gonna affect the ops in any way, like, every single thing is connected, I want people's opinion, not to have to take everyone's opinion, but you want people's opinions. So you can see from a different perspective, because there's no way for anyone, you know, to really know all the answers just doesn't happen. And then what happens is, and that's just the start, every feature that we launched, it takes a lot of iterations, a lot of feedback, a lot of all these different things. And then that's where it really begins truthfully. Because once you launch the product, you have to assume and majority of products you launch don't work, or parts of it work, or you get customer feedback that says know what this will be great. So really trying to take it an expanded to what do the customers want is this thing that you just built, really gonna solve the customers, you know, issues or complaints. And if it's not, you learn from them, and you figure out how to adapt it, you know, we've launched features two years ago that we're still tinkering with and adapting and making better. And some of these features are doing millions of dollars a month in sales, but they're still not right. And we're still trying to make it better or find it, it just the constant iteration.

Roy Sharples:

I like the fact that you take an end to end systems view, and you include every aspect within that. And then you move at rapid refinement and iteration to get those kind of inputs and then have the agility to make fixes as you can go along. I think that's a great approach. What do you believe to be the key skills needed to be an entrepreneur?

Jeremy Parker:

It's a good question. For me, I think the most important skill that I have that allowed me to grow I don't know if it's for everybody, but I think I really, I think it's, it's an important skill is to be okay with failure. I think that's the kind of the main thing I think most people don't do things because they're afraid they're afraid to fail. And I think if you kind of can remove that, that nervousness, or that that, no, I'm not, should I do this? Should I not do this? Just do it. Like literally do it. And by the way, you don't even need to have a great idea from the start. You don't even have to know all the answers. You're never going to know all the answers, really, you'll never know. So just take the first step, commit to something and be open minded to learn and new debt. I think as an entrepreneur, that's all you need to do. Remove the fear. It's okay to fail. If you do fail, which you're expected to learn from that failure and get better from it.

Roy Sharples:

That's great advice. So you don't have time machine, Jeremy, and it's going backward, based on the lessons learned to date in terms of the pitfalls to avoid the keys to success. What would you share with a younger Jeremy?

Jeremy Parker:

I would say the biggest lesson I learned, and I definitely did not do this and it, I had a business, one business that was starting is a social networking app. And basically, it took us about a year and a half to get the app launched, because we wanted to make it so perfect. And then when we launched it, we realized that a lot of the features that we thought were so important, the customers couldn't care about at all. And the features that that the customers cared about, we didn't even think about, what I would suggest all entrepreneurs is launch an MVP, or a minimum viable product as quickly as possible, really launched something, it doesn't have to be perfect, it's never gonna be perfect, it will never be perfect. Even if you spent two years on it five years on it, it will never be perfect. So you might as well launch really early, get feedback, feedback is really the most important thing of a business, because you can learn so much in those early days of with the right product to build. And it's so important, especially as a young entrepreneur, or an early entrepreneur, that you don't have tons of resources, you don't have tons of money, you don't have unlimited time to build out something and learn, like these major companies are raising, you know, hundreds of millions of dollars that, you know, they could waste time and they could do things, they could throw things into wall like you'll have that time. So just launched something really quickly. get feedback, iterate on it, keep launching things, iterate on it. And I think as long as you could do that you're going to get you're going to figure out your product market fit, you're going to figure out what product your customers really want a lot earlier. So you're gonna have a lot more kind of powder indication of all your money saved up. And then you can start really acquiring customers and growing. So I would just say launch really much earlier than you expect. That's another great, great nugget of advice,

Roy Sharples:

Jeremy, so you're still in the Time Machine and it's moving forward? What's your vision for the future?

Jeremy Parker:

Our entire strategy for swag was very simple, you know, get in the door through the office manager, given the amazing experience for customers to buy swag. That was really the only thing we thought about in the very beginning, make the experience of buying swag, seamless, finding the products, uploading your logo, mocking things up, checking out pricing things out in a matter of seconds, and just making their experience effortless, then it became about two years ago. Well, now they're we're having an amazing experience about for buying swag. How do we allow these companies to distribute their swag. So really building out this whole infrastructure of swag distribution, where you can buy 1000 t shirts and upload a CSV file and ship 1000 t shirts to 1000 different addresses or send you know 20 t shirts to one address, or you don't have the addresses of your recipients and create a swag giveaway, where you can capture the information of your recipients what t shirt size they are, what color t shirts they want, all speaking to our system and then distributing it, then we kept expanding it well Now that we're allowing people to easily distribute swag and capture addresses of distribution when if they wanted to message or swipe differently. So we're building all these management tools of allowing the marketing team to have the marketing closet and the sales team to have a sales closet in the London office at the London closet. So really being able to break it down by department location, budget permission settings, approval flows, really allowing people to manage your swag and more kind of how the way they want to manage it, being able to see in real time all of the inventory at all times and be able to distribute it and connecting the dots all to an e commerce experience. So that when you're ever running low, you can easily go to the e commerce experience and buy a little bit more it's fully connected, not two separate platforms. It's one the same. So really focusing on that. I think the future for swag is obviously key buildings out keep making the experience better, but then ultimately automating the distribution of swag. Like what if you could build a swag API, which is in the works right now or is a beer integration or integration to you know, Salesforce, etc, and allowing people with a click of a button to distribute swag. So all you have to do is buy it once it's held in inventory and then automate the distribution. It's somebody's birthday send them swag, something automatically, it's a five year anniversary automatically sends a trigger to send them swag somebody buys $1,000 or more on your Shopify site automatically triggers swag to be sent to them. Any reason why you want to send swag now that we have the commerce experience for buying it, the distribution experience for for holding it warehousing and distributing it, add the layer of automation, it becomes like a much, much simpler process for everybody. any single company, any division could use swag and kind of set it and forget it. That's kind of the future for this year.

Roy Sharples:

It's very easy to detect your charisma, energy and drive which must be contagious amongst your team, the people that you work with, and also your audience. And I wish you and swag.com all the very best for the future. It's been an absolute joy, listening to your story.

Jeremy Parker:

I do appreciate appreciate having me on and I appreciate you allow me to tell my story. and introduce myself to your audience. It's been great getting to know you great, great speaking about it. And you know, obviously I'm 830 where I am I'm in San Diego. So it's a I think it's a great way to start the day, you know, thinking about things I wasn't thinking about before.

Roy Sharples:

True innovators see through the audience's very soul via intuition, the empirical observational and anecdotal methods and techniques. They are people of action, who are always future oriented. They are the doers, the people who start things, move the world forward and inspire others to do it too. Follow your heart and make a living from doing what you love. by falling in love with your craft, pursuing it with intensity and being exceptional artists. Always keep true to the dreams of your youth. Everything you need is already inside of you. It's all about attitude, imagination and execution. You have been listening to the unknown origins podcast, please follow us, subscribe, rate and review us. For more information go to unknown origins.com Thank you for listening.